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Wit and Wisdom

  • * We are currently working in Module 3 and learning about understanding all sides of a story! 

    WIT & WISDOM is our current reding program, which uses authentic and high quality text for enable students to learn, and eventually master, essential reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammar, and vocabulary. Students read books they love, to build knowledge of important topics and master literacy skills. There are 4 modules.

    Module 1: A Great Heart

    In this first module, A Great Heart, we will examine the complexity of the human heart. Not only is the heart a biological wonder, it is also a symbol of human emotions. We will explore what it means to have a “great heart,” both literally and figuratively.

    OUR CLASS WILL READ THESE BOOKS:

    • Love That Dog, Sharon Creech Poems
    • “The Red Wheelbarrow,” William Carlos Williams
    • “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” Robert Frost
    • “The Pasture,” Robert Frost
    • “Love That Boy,” Walter Dean Myers
    • “dog,” Valerie Worth
    • “Heart to Heart,” Rita Dove Picture Book
    • The Circulatory Story, Mary K. Corcoran 172

    OUR CLASS WILL EXAMINE THIS PAINTING: The Clinic of Dr. Gross, Thomas Eakins

    OUR CLASS WILL WATCH THIS VIDEO: “Exploring the Heart: The Circulatory System”

    OUR CLASS WILL ASK THESE QUESTIONS:

    1. How does someone show a great heart, figuratively? 
    2. What is a great heart, literally? 
    3. How do the characters in Love That Dog show characteristics of great heart? 
    4. What does it mean to have a great heart, literally and figuratively?

    QUESTIONS TO ASK AT HOME

    As your fourth grade student reads, ask:  What do you notice and wonder? 

     

    Module 2: Extreme Settings 

    In this second module, Extreme Settings, we will examine how people react to extreme environments. Students will analyze what makes landscapes like mountains challenging. We will ask the question: How do humans survive against the odds? 

    OUR CLASS WILL READ THESE BOOKS AND STORIES:

    • Hatchet, Gary Paulsen Short Story
    • “All Summer in a Day,” Ray Bradbury Scientific Account
    • Mountains, Seymour Simon ƒ SAS Survival Handbook: The Ultimate Guide to Surviving Anywhere, John “Lofty” Wiseman Poems
    • “Dust of Snow,” Robert Frost 
    • “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” Robert Frost

    OUR CLASS WILL EXAMINE IMAGES OF THIS ARCHITECTURE:

    Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright

     OUR CLASS WILL ASK THESE QUESTIONS: 

    1. How does the setting affect the characters or speakers in the text?
    2. What makes a mountainous environment extreme? 
    3. How does setting influence character and plot development? 
    4. How does a challenging setting or physical environment change a person?

    QUESTIONS TO ASK AT HOME: As your fourth-grade student reads, ask: 

    • What’s happening?
    • What does a closer look at words and illustrations reveal about this text’s deeper meaning?

     

    Module 3: The Redcoats Are Coming ( This is our current Module!)

    In the third module, The Redcoats Are Coming!, we will use a critical eye to see how the American Revolution was a foundation for American history. With a focus on identifying and understanding perspective and its impact on our understanding of events and decisions people make, students will gain greater skill in the area of critical thinking as both readers and writers. We will ask the question: Why is it important to understand all sides of a story?

    OUR CLASS WILL READ THESE BOOKS AND STORIES: 

    • Woods Runner, Gary Paulsen Picture Book (Literary)
    • The Scarlet Stockings Spy, Trina Hakes Noble Historical Account (Informational)
    • George vs. George: The American Revolution as Seen from Both Sides, Rosalyn Schanzer Poetry
    • Colonial Voices: Hear Them Speak, Kay Winters

     OUR CLASS WILL ASK THESE QUESTIONS: 

    1. What were the perspectives of the two main sides of the American Revolution?

    2. How did different people’s experiences affect their perspectives about the American Revolution?

    3. How did different people’s perspectives affect their actions during the American Revolution?

    4. What drove the Patriots to fight for their independence from Britain?

    QUESTIONS TO ASK AT HOME: 

    • What is happening in the story?
    • What is the essential meaning, or most important message, in this book?
    • How does this story build your knowledge about the American Revolution?\

    BOOKS TO READ AT HOME:

    • Can’t You Make Them Behave, King George?, Jean Fritz
    • For Liberty, Timothy Decker
    • Chains, Laurie Halse Anderson
    • Forge, Laurie Halse Anderson
    • Johnny Tremain, Esther Hoskins Forbes 
    • My Brother Sam is Dead, James Lincoln Collier 
    • George Washington, Spymaster, Thomas B. Allen
    • Sophia’s War: A Tale of Revolution, Avi
    • Sam the Minuteman, Nathaniel Benchley 
    • If You Lived in the Times of the American Revolution, Kay Moore
    • Did it All Start with a Snowball Fight?, Mary Kay Carson
    • Sybil Ludington’s Midnight Ride, Marsha Amstel
    • Samuel’s Choice, Richard Berleth

    Module 4: Myth Making (coming soon)